tessdenton

Archive for October, 2012|Monthly archive page

Change and Transformation – Elements of Success

In Abundance, Career, Coaching, Destiny, Goals, Mentoring, Prosperity, Success, Transformation, Uncategorized, Vision, Vision Boards on 2012/10/27 at 1:29 pm

I came across two very powerful phrases while at a business retreat last week: Change is doing things differently. Transformation is being differently.

The “change” statement  refers to activity or behavior and is something that can generally be outwardly measured.  The “transformation” statement refers to an internal shift and may not be visible to the naked eye, yet it is palpable – not only to the individual is being different, but to those around them.

Have you ever seen someone after weeks or months of being separated, and notice they are somehow different when next you meet?  In trying to pinpoint he change, we tend to work from the outside in. We begin by taking note of possible changes in surface elements, such as appearance. We slowly work our way inside – to the essence  or the aura, or the way the individual carries herself. While changes to our shell, our appearance are most evident, change in our attitude and demeanor are equally noticeable.

There are three key types of change:

  • Developmental Change
  • Transitional Change
  • Transformational Change

Developmental changes are those you make to improve procedures or activities that will complement your current lifestyle. Think of your exercise program. If you want to improve your upper body muscle tone, you add weight conditioning to your workout. Simple examples: If you think about diet, if you want change the percentage of your diet that is made up of an additional 25% raw foods, add a salad at two meals daily. Development changes generally cause little stress and distress.  In professional settings: Learning new skills that will improve your performance or prepare you for promotion are good examples of developmental change.

Transitional changes are those you make to replace existing approaches or activities with new ones. A replacement example: use olive oil rather than butter in cooking. Eat celery and carrots rather than potato chips. You’ll retain the enjoyment of something crunchy, but it will be a healthy change.   Instead of sitting down and eating ice cream each evening right after dinner, take a twenty-minute walk and reward yourself with a cup of tea.  You’ll be changing you diet and your lifestyle.  In professional settings: If your company has become part of another organization, learning a new software system or learning how a new supervisor wants reports and information communicated are examples of transitional change.

Transformational changes are those you make to completely reshape your life. It is this level of change in which we create sustainable momentum toward getting the life we want. When you’ve achieved transformational change, you have grown, you have stretched, and you will not be reverting to your former way of looking at or approaching life. It is at this level that people often develop the ability to take the long view on life and business, on action and consequence.

Many people arrive at the threshold of transformational change after attempts to transform their lives through changes in surroundings, friends and activities, with little significant result. They discover that a quick fix will not fundamentally change your life. They discover that  transformational change is a journey, not an activity.

Awakening to your transformational journey is refreshing. It’s like opening the windows and doors to let the fresh air circulate through your house after a long winter.

I am in the midst of some self-reflection and examination. I’ve spent the past year and a half “reinventing” my professional focus. I can tell you what I’m doing differently, but that is all information about what has changed on two levels: My business activities and my lifestyle activities (travel, workout, diet). It’s time for me to pinpoint fundamental changes in my way of being to determine whether I’ve just been on a whirlwind trip or if I am on a journey – a path toward transformational change.

If you are asking yourself similar questions, I have three books I’d like to recommend. The first two were published a number of years ago. The books are: The Four Agreements (Don Miguel Ruiz), Women Who Run with the Wolves (Clarissa Pinkola Estes) [2 of my sisters just returned from a 5-day retreat with Clarissa and simply raved about her insight and authenticity), and my own book Building A Powerful Vision Board: A Path To Achieving Your Goals and What You Want In Life [This book leads you through a process of clarification, creation and action to advance on your path to fulfilling your personal/professional goals].

I’m enjoying my journey and making plans to focus on the transformation and not just the action elements of my life in 2013.

As always, I welcome your comments, and make it a great week.

~ Tess

Copyright 2012, Destiny Rising, LLC.

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Change and Transformation: Great Change Leads to Great Results!

In Uncategorized on 2012/10/27 at 1:20 pm

I came across two very powerful phrases while at a business retreat last week: Change is doing things differently. Transformation is being differently.

The “change” statement  refers to activity or behavior and is something that can generally be outwardly measured.  The “transformation” statement refers to an internal shift and may not be visible to the naked eye, yet it is palpable – not only to the individual is being different, but to those around them.

Have you ever seen someone after weeks or months of being separated, and notice they are somehow different when next you meet?  In trying to pinpoint he change, we tend to work from the outside in. We begin by taking note of possible changes in surface elements, such as appearance. We slowly work our way inside – to the essence  or the aura, or the way the individual carries herself. While changes to our shell, our appearance are most evident, change in our attitude and demeanor are equally noticeable.

There are three key types of change:

  • Developmental Change
  • Transitional Change
  • Transformational Change

Developmental changes are those you make to improve procedures or activities that will complement your current lifestyle. Think of your exercise program. If you want to improve your upper body muscle tone, you add weight conditioning to your workout. Simple examples: If you think about diet, if you want change the percentage of your diet that is made up of an additional 25% raw foods, add a salad at two meals daily. Development changes generally cause little stress and distress.  In professional settings: Learning new skills that will improve your performance or prepare you for promotion are good examples of developmental change.

Transitional changes are those you make to replace existing approaches or activities with new ones. A replacement example: use olive oil rather than butter in cooking. Eat celery and carrots rather than potato chips. You’ll retain the enjoyment of something crunchy, but it will be a healthy change.   Instead of sitting down and eating ice cream each evening right after dinner, take a twenty-minute walk and reward yourself with a cup of tea.  You’ll be changing you diet and your lifestyle.  In professional settings: If your company has become part of another organization, learning a new software system or learning how a new supervisor wants reports and information communicated are examples of transitional change.

Transformational changes are those you make to completely reshape your life. It is this level of change in which we create sustainable momentum toward getting the life we want. When you’ve achieved transformational change, you have grown, you have stretched, and you will not be reverting to your former way of looking at or approaching life. It is at this level that people often develop the ability to take the long view on life and business, on action and consequence.

Many people arrive at the threshold of transformational change after attempts to transform their lives through changes in surroundings, friends and activities, with little significant result. They discover that a quick fix will not fundamentally change your life. They discover that  transformational change is a journey, not an activity.

Awakening to your transformational journey is refreshing. It’s like opening the windows and doors to let the fresh air circulate through your house after a long winter.

I am in the midst of some self-reflection and examination. I’ve spent the past year and a half “reinventing” my professional focus. I can tell you what I’m doing differently, but that is all information about what has changed on two levels: My business activities and my lifestyle activities (travel, workout, diet). It’s time for me to pinpoint fundamental changes in my way of being to determine whether I’ve just been on a whirlwind trip or if I am on a journey – a path toward transformational change.

If you are asking yourself similar questions, I have three books I’d like to recommend. The first two were published a number of years ago. The books are: The Four Agreements (Don Miguel Ruiz), Women Who Run with the Wolves (Clarissa Pinkola Estes) [2 of my sisters just returned from a 5-day retreat with Clarissa and simply raved about her insight and authenticity), and my own book Building A Powerful Vision Board: A Path To Achieving Your Goals and What You Want In Life [This book leads you through a process of clarification, creation and action to advance on your path to fulfilling your personal/professional goals].

I’m enjoying my journey and making plans to focus on the transformation and not just the action elements of my life in 2013.

As always, I welcome your comments, and make it a great week.

~ Tess

Copyright 2012, Destiny Rising, LLC.

“Pause and Be” so that you CAN Be Joyful and Productive

In Uncategorized on 2012/10/05 at 7:29 am

Experience Joy

The time I take every morning to just BE, to be fully present, is the key to the JOY I feel every day, the secret to my awesome productivity, and the sense of adventure I feel every day.   ~ Rich German

I’m always on the lookout for good ideas and great advice. I found it in an e-mail from Rick German, and I chose it as the quote for this post. Rich’s e-mail was expertly timed.

It was still dark outside when I woke up this morning. Everything was very quiet as I slipped out from under the blankets to enjoy some precious quiet time before the busy-ness of the day took hold. In my quiet time, the tick-tock of the antique clock and the coffee brewing provided lovely background sounds. I simply sat and enjoyed my surroundings and took the time to appreciate the cozyness of my home in autumn on this final morning before a busy 7-day  work trip. This morning was my relaxed version of “Pause and Be”.

My active version of “Pause and Be” is that I jump out of bed and immediately get ready for a morning 3-mile walk with a co-worker or my dog.This version is  refreshing, I soak in the beauty of nature and I am refreshed and invigorated for a productive day.

One of the joys of my life is that I make appreciation and simple routine a part of my life. It took time to learn the importance of slowing down. I have learned to pause at various times of the day – and to recognize that this 24-hour period, will only come around once – for better or for worse. Since I was a teenager, I’ve had a tendency to g0-g0-g0 (as my mom often reminded  me) in a blitz of activity. Adding some pauses in the day has multiplied my appreciation for ease and it leaves room for plenty of accomplishment.

My recommendation this week – Ask the people in your life who are happiest and most productive (you may be one of them) about their formula presence and productivity. Adopting their practice may enhance your success and add some punch to your day!

As always, I welcome your comments – and make it a great day!

~ Tess

Copyright 2012, Destiny Rising, LLC

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